Dear Sabrina

 

I have some exciting news to share!  I am now a contributor on the lovely and thoughtful blog, Dear Sabrina. 

When Jodi asked me to contribute to her blog, I was intrigued. It had been a while since I’d published anything to my own blog, a space that has evolved from a knitting blog to a personal blog and website. I felt somewhat apprehensive; what did I have to add there? Then she and I had some interesting conversations about possible content and suddenly I was brimming with new ideas!

It feels really, really good to be writing in a more personal way again. I used to spend a lot of my creative energy within my biz, writing copy for products, email newsletters, and captions for social media posts. To get to put a different kind of writing out in the world has me feeling a little vulnerable, but also really excited.

I am thrilled to bring some of the topics Jodi and I have been discussing in real life to this space. I look forward to joining the conversations Jodi has started on topics like parenting, friendship, books, and maybe even my own categories of melancholy.

My first post went up this week, a piece about authenticity and vulnerability in friendship. I do hope you’ll read it and let us know what you think!

Photo by Kyle Glenn on Unsplash

Life After Stash

It’s been nearly one month since I closed the doors of my business. One month since I let go of a dream I had spent the past 7 years building, growing and nurturing. It feels like a long time ago, and yet I also sometimes still drive to work on auto-pilot, catching myself as I look for parking.

What will I do next? I’ve gotten that question more times than I can count in the past couple of months. The short answer is this: I will take some time to be with my family, to be a mom and a wife instead of a harried entrepreneurial working mom who happens to have two kids and be married to that person over there.

While that’s true, it’s not the whole story.

The truth is, I’m exhausted.

The past 18 months have been so full of contradictory emotions and a million decisions about the business. On top of running the business itself and managing my daily life, I was struggling with feelings of failure, grief, and a profound sense that I’d let people down. You can head here to read a little bit more about my decision to close Stash.

Now that the business is gone, ostensibly the stress is too. While I do feel about one thousand pounds lighter, it also feels like I have a stress hangover. My monkey mind has been busy for years processing all I have to juggle; now that a few balls are out of rotation, my mind is still trying to juggle them. It’s been hard to relax.

In this life after Stash, I am craving hibernation, a blanket of quiet, and lots and lots of hot beverages. Some Netflix couldn’t hurt, either. (I just finished this and was mesmerized)

One of the ways I am seeking quiet in my life is by taking a social media break. This is something I do regularly; it’s a good practice for me to step away and live my life instead of thinking about how to share it. This time I am planning on taking all of February off of Facebook and Instagram. I have enough going on in my head that I don’t need to pour in the voices of other people, multiple times a day. 8 days in, and I feel more peaceful already.

Another way I am seeking quiet is by spending time in my new studio!  I am sharing space with good friend and jewelry designer Liz Grant. This is a space that I stumbled into, and as luck would have it, this has been the perfect landing space for me.

My new studio is quiet and filled with light. I have a desk and some plants and not much else. This is the place I have yearned for for years: the physical and intangible room to write. I plan on doing a lot of practicing in this space. And as much as I’d like to attach an outcome to this writing (there goes that brain again), I am simply committing to writing for the sake of writing. We’ll see where it all goes.

This is a time of transition, a time of rest and contemplation. A time to let go of expectations and just be quiet with myself. It’s uncomfortable; I want to know what’s next, of course. But this time is also a gift, one I intend to settle into and savor for as longs as it lasts.

I’m curious: how have you settled in to time between jobs or life after a big transition?

A Room of My Own: Why Creative Space Matters

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Sometimes it feels like my kids simply cannot keep their hands to themselves. They can’t help it, I know this. Powerful curiosity paired with a lack of impulse control means small children touch EVERYTHING. They want to feel the surface of a book. Tap the hard glass on a picture frame. Stroke the glossy leaves of a houseplant. Tap tap tap on the keys of the laptop.  Sift through the detritus in my nightstand drawer. You get the picture.

Much of this exploring is delightful to watch, and mostly harmless. But some of it grates on me, makes me feel violated in a way. Like each poke of a little finger into my brand new blush compact is a poke in my eye.

As a parent I try not to take my kids’ behavior too personally. I know and respect that they are their own people trying to make sense of the world just like the rest of us. Our children are given room to roam within the boundaries of our family rules, and it mostly goes okay.

Where I’m still struggling to find flexibility and ease is in claiming some personal physical space.


When we first moved into our house, my vision of each living space was so clear. We have a two-story home, and and the first floor has our living and dining rooms, kitchen, and a half-bath.

We also have a lovely extra room at the front of the house with double doors, a transom window above, and tons of natural light thanks to a large east-facing window. My daughter was a toddler when we moved in, and making this space a playroom was ideal. She could have a space to play and create and be messy. It was close to the main living areas, and having this space meant no toys in those living areas. I took great pleasure in designing the room. We shopped at Ikea and put together a desk and cubbies and hung picture wires to display her creations. It was perfect.

We have spent countless hours together over the years in this sweet room working with play dough, painting at the easel, building train tracks, stacking blocks, reading books. It was exactly what we needed for that phase of life.

Somewhere along the way, she started spending less time in the playroom and more time in her bedroom. She was getting older and wanted her own space. Then along came baby brother, and soon this room with its paint and markers and tiny lego pieces wasn’t as appealing a place to hang out. We slowly started moving things in and out of the room to make it work.

Soon we were spending less and less time in the playroom.

Meanwhile, I had started a podcast. I had started offering coaching to other creatives and was working from home more.  Our desk was tucked into a living space, and would naturally invite lots of curious little hands to its surfaces. A computer screen was damaged. Papers were crumpled. Nerves (mine) started to get frayed.

And then one day it dawned on me: What if we turned the playroom into an office?

It felt daring and exciting; the perfect solution. It also felt SELFISH as hell.

Who was I to take this sweet kid space away from the family in order to have space for me and my brain to think and create?  

And yet I couldn’t shake the dream.

At the beginning of the year I had made a vision board. It wasn’t until the piece was complete that I noticed a pattern. Desks. Modern chairs. Lots of invitations to write. My heart knew what I desired before my mind knew.  And once I realized that, I had to get my brain – and family – on board.

It was tough. There was resistance to this new arrangement from every side. My daughter cried. My wife bemoaned the loss of the kids’ artwork display.  I still felt guilty.

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In the end we compromised, and the room is now a shared creative space.

The original creative workspace has moved to one corner and holds our household art supplies. A rotating display of original creations hangs above. The toys are (mostly) gone, replaced by an adult desk and computer. A bookshelf relocated from another area of the house holds books, family photo albums, and a shelf of puzzles and quiet work for the kids. I hung my vision board and slowly added my treasures.

Creating this space was important both for my actual creative process but also in owning the importance of my work.  Having a physical space brings my ambitions out of my head and into the real world. Ultimately, this area represents the creative potential in all of us, from little hands to big hands.

Some of my favorite moments are when the kids and I are all in here quietly working. My daughter will be drawing or writing a story at her desk. I will be editing a podcast, writing a blog post, or daydreaming. My son will most likely be driving a car back and forth on the windowsill. There’s often a cat or dog asleep somewhere.

It’s these moments that I could choose to be annoyed that they’ve invaded “my space” or I could choose to be content with the arrangement. Full disclosure: there are days where I have to kick them out and close the door!  It’s okay. 

These years are short, and soon enough I will miss these busy little hands. In the meantime, I am so glad I staked my claim in one corner of a room to help my creative spirit. And, even though I thought I needed the room all to myself, it’s been a delight to do this work alongside my kids.

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The playroom before.

How to Gain Clarity and Move Toward Your Dreams

Do any of these phrases sound familiar?

  • I’d love to try to publish my knitting designs. 
  • I’ve always wanted to write a book.
  • I dream of moving to the beach/mountains/city and living a new life.

But …

  • I’m not good enough, don’t know enough, don’t have time right now.
  • I have kids, a job, a mortgage . . .
  • Who am I to sell my stuff, tell my story, follow a dream?

 

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I’ve been there. Hell, suppressing those negative inner voices is an almost daily task for me.  But I’ve gotten used to them, and I know they’re not telling me the truth.

So often we talk ourselves out of our dreams. We talk over and ignore them. We brush them off as silly or impractical. We delay them for some nebulous time in the future when we have more time or more money or better skills or more confidence.

I’m tired of putting dreams on hold. Secretly, most people are, but they don’t know what to do about it.

Gain Clarity and Move Toward Your Dreams

The first step in moving toward your dreams is acknowledging them. The second step is taking action.

Find your dreams.

Sometimes we’ve stuffed our juiciest, larger-than-life dreams deep down inside. We have responsibilities, after all!  Your job is to reconnect with your dreams. Here’s an ide:

Try meditating or taking a walk (no phones allowed) to clear your head. Take as long as you want for this step. Really let yourself imagine the possibilities or to shake off the limiting thoughts you’re so used to carrying. 

When you’re done, sit down with a journal and write for 5 minutes to the prompt I want or I dream about. Write down whatever comes to your head. Don’t judge or try to figure out practicalities. Let yourself dream. Big, small, whatever comes up for you, write it down.

Now look at what you wrote. What truths do you find there that you expected? What did you write that surprised you? 

Now comes the hard question: what are you going to do about it?

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Take one small step.

What is one thing you can do right now to move toward that dream? Schedule time to paint once a week, no matter what. Sign up for that writing class you’ve been dithering about. Email a friend who sells her handiwork to see if you can ask her some questions. Talk to your partner or somebody supportive about this dream and brainstorm what you could do.

Get support.

Going for your dreams can be scary—and exhilarating. It’s easy to fall back into old habits of shutting down the dream, throwing up your own roadblocks, or getting stuck in indecision.

A coach can help you see next step, call you on your bullshit, work with you on mindset issues. You still have to commit. You still have to do the work, but you’ve got somebody to hold you accountable, cheer you on, and give you fresh perspective.

Last year I had the bold idea to help other people realize their creative dreams. At the time I was running a brick and mortar business, parenting my two young kids, and living a full, sometimes stressful life. Who was I to add another big dream to my life?  I thought about putting this dream on hold until a better time.  But then I decided to just dive in. Live boldly.

I can help you move toward your creative dream.

So what is your crazy dream? The one you feel silly talking about or hide in your heart because you’re afraid others will think it’s silly and it’s really important to you. Even if you don’t talk about it.

What dream have you been ignoring or telling yourself you couldn’t really do that?

What if I told you that you could?

Find your dream. Act boldly. Live your dream.

I’d love to help.

Click here to learn more about my Creative Clarity Sessions

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Are Priorities Holding You Back from the Life You Want?

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There was a time when I was very hard on myself for not living up to my own ideal of what motherhood should look like.

After years of infertility treatments, I finally got what I thought was my dream job: I was a stay-at-home mama! I kept up with my ideal almost obsessively. From cloth diapers and homemade play doh to long, media free afternoons of unstructured playtime, I had it all mapped out. And for a while, it worked. Sure, I lived for nap-time when I wasn’t needed so much and could tend to my own needs (a shower, please!). But eventually, about a year into the parenting gig, I realized I needed MORE.

I started a business when my daughter was just 20 months old. Writing a business plan, signing a lease, and ordering inventory with a toddler in tow was no easy feat! And I was still trying to hold myself to my previous standards. The ones I was able to achieve when I wasn’t starting a business.

It’s true what they say: you can have it all, but you can’t have it all at the same time.

I quickly realized that things would have to change; the way we were doing things just wasn’t sustainable. And I was being so hard on myself, giving to my business, my employees, my child, my partner, my friends. There was nothing left of me.

And then I had a second child and things got harder.

My priorities, the things that were supposed to drive the life I wanted, needed a major overhaul.

The days became so full I couldn’t keep up with washing poopy diapers. I was so tired that the thought of making dinner brought me to tears. There was no space in my mind for any more needs from anyone, let alone the needs of this ideal motherhood I wanted to have.

Because I couldn’t change the needs of my kids — they’re still quite small and their needs are totally age appropriate — I realized I had to change MY needs. My priorities had to shift into accomplishing what was truly important to me. I had to let go of unnecessary projects and busywork at the shop. I needed to stop fixating on all the things I used to enjoy that no longer served my day to day reality.

Sure, I used to make play clay; you can buy that. I used to use cloth diapers, but I chose more time reading with my kids over washing diapers. I had to let those things go because not living up to unrealistic expectations (my own) was breaking me down. I examined all of the things I felt I “should” be doing to decide which really mattered to me.

These days I choose to spend time on the things that resonate now. Baking. Practicing yoga. Picking up my kids from school each day. Focusing on the parts of work that make the biggest difference to my business and that light me up.  And if I want to make some play dough, I will because I want to, not because I feel like I should!

What are you doing because you feel like you should? Even if the should grew out of your own values and desires once? What are you doing because you once loved it that isn’t serving you right now? What, if you really stopped to think about it, is most important to do in your day?

Before you reflexively say “It’s all important,” let yourself admit what really resonates with you. It’s OK to stop doing something that was an important part of your life if it isn’t serving you right now. Priorities aren’t static. By taking time to re-examine them when things aren’t working, we can move closer to the life we really want to live.

What can you let go of? What can you embrace to move toward the bold life you dream of?

When you’re in the thick of things, it can be hard to see where you can make change. Sometimes the “shoulds” are so ingrained we think they are “musts.” That’s where I come in. I can help you get past your own blocks to dare to live the life you dream of (even if you hide that dream from yourself). It starts with clarity.

Learn more about Clarity Sessions and book yours today.

Live Your Bold, Creative Life: Intuition & an Ass Kicking


My alarm was set for 3:45 AM on Friday morning. But you know how it goes when your brain is both excited about the day to come and anxious that the body won’t wake up in time to make it happen. You either sleep terribly or you wake up super early. Luckily for me, I woke up just one minute before my alarm, and was able to let the anticipation of the weekend to come wash over me.

I was headed to the Radiance Retreat, a gathering of women that was part personal development, business seminar, and fitness training.  This last part was outside my comfort zone, but something told me I had to be there.

I was looking forward to disconnecting with my real life. Things had been rough on the sleep front with my littlest. The days toward the end of the school year had gotten so full and hectic. And then there was all the shit going on in my head.

You see, I have been contemplating a bold move of my own. A move that would result in me living a bigger, bolder, life and putting even more of myself out there in the world.

I want to help women connect with their own desires to live a bold, creative life.

I dream of doing this through one-on-one engagements where we can connect on a deeper level and get to the heart of your big dreams. We can move through your roadblocks, and I will help you get clear on the exact steps you need to take to get you moving in the direction of your dream.

My dream of becoming a Creative Coach feels audacious and exciting, and I love thinking about it! But this dream was also bringing up all my inner gremlins. I was stuck in a cycle of self-doubt that boils down to one thought:

Who am I to think I can help other people?

I’ve been wavering about whether or not to take the plunge for MONTHS. There are always a million excuses why you shouldn’t do the thing you’re dreaming of deep inside.

Here are some mindset roadblocks I’ve experienced:

  • I don’t have enough time.
  • I don’t have the money to invest.
  • I’m already doing so much.
  • No one wants to hear what I have to say.
  • There are already so many coaches out there doing it better than me.
  • What will happen to my existing business?

But the simple truth is it’s all bullshit. It’s all a way of holding yourself back, of playing small, of not living the life you desire.

These doubts and excuses create noise in your head, drowning out your inner voice. Your deeper intuition that knows exactly what you should do.

I’m just as guilty of falling into these traps as the next person. Ironically, I have a lot of tools for moving through those doubts and fears to get to the good stuff.

But in this case, I wasn’t able to use them on myself. I was allowing myself to fall victim to my tendency to people please, to put others’ needs and wants before my own, and to get so full of ideas and doubts that I couldn’t even hear my own voice anymore.


So back to this weekend…

I was in emotional pain when I arrived, desperately hoping to gain some clarity of purpose about all of this. If that didn’t happen, a couple of hours reading on the beach would do. I just needed a break from the cycle of relentless questioning I was in.

What I got from the experience was so much more.

Connection to new friends and time to connect with myself.

Acceptance as-is from other women

Motivation to stop wavering and move forward with swift and decisive action

Tears. There were tears within the first 30 minutes of this retreat. We cut through the surface and dove into why each of us was there and it got intense very quickly. Which was so good because it liberated us from the small talk and encouraged us all to connect openly and with integrity.

Laughter. When you’ve connected about the tough stuff in life, it feels really good to laugh with people.

Relaxation.  I gave myself permission to opt in only to those activities that really excited or challenged me. Looking at the schedule for the weekend ahead, I saw that the second afternoon included a 2.5 hour workout session. Instantly upon seeing that, my gut told me a big NO. Not because I was scared or nervous — I went to other exercise activities — but because I knew it would be the best opportunity to get some downtime at the beautiful beach. It was one of the best decisions I made all weekend! When I shared that I was choosing beach over barbells, it opened up that possibility for some other women who had been questioning.

A kick in the ass.  Jill Coleman is an incredible example of doing what you want with an unwavering certainty that what you have to offer is valuable and that you deserve success. Her business has evolved over time and she is now offering up her own brand of business coaching. I was riveted by her confident, unapologetic approach to business and the transformations hers has taken over the years..

At the end of her talk on the last day, she offered up a big challenge: Put up a buy button on your website by midnight that night. Cut through the excuses and doubts and just get it done.

So I did. What are you going to do?


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Introducing the Live Your Bold Creative Life Clarity Sessions

You have big dreams, but they tend to stay in the idea phase. You’re afraid to move forward. You don’t have the time or money right now. You don’t know what step to take.

I’ll help you:

  • Gain clarity on the big dream you can’t stop thinking about
  • Create an action plan to get you moving forward
  • Get unstuck and release some of the beliefs that have been holding you back

Putting something out into the world and offering yourself up to others who need what you have to offer is more important than holding on to your old beliefs. It’s bigger than your to-do list and your lack of tech knowledge, or the numbers in your bank account. The thing that you do or make or say has value beyond all the other self-doubt and negativity in your head.

I’m stepping out of my comfort zone and moving forward in my dreams. You can too. I hope you’ll join me on this journey. Click the link below to grab your spot and start living your dream life.

I’m ready to live bold!

From Uncertain to Confident: A 5-Minute Reframe

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I’ve been doing a lot of work around getting comfortable with being uncomfortable. With facing my fears and moving forward in spite of them.

One of my favorite tools to leverage the discomfort and get me out of the cycle of self-doubt is to do a Fear Dump. This powerful 5-minute exercise will take you from feeling uncertain to feeling more confident and powerful. I got this idea from my business coach Megan Flatt, and it works wonders!

Fear Dump Exercise

  • Set a timer for 5 minutes.
  • Write down all of your fears and uncertainties around a new idea.  Don’t censor or edit yourself, just let it ALL out!
  • At the end of 5 minutes, go through the list and ask yourself: Why is this statement NOT true?  I want you to literally cross out all the negative words in each sentence.  This act will instantly reframe the fear into a very powerful statement.

For example:

I’m afraid that I don’t have a unique message to share with people.

becomes

I have a unique message to share with people.

—–

I’m afraid people won’t want to buy what I make.

becomes

People want to buy what I make!

Powerful, right?!

This simple exercise can help you build confidence around a new idea, give power to the positive, and help banish the uncertainties and fears that have been holding you back.


What’s one uncertainty you’re living with right now?  I’d like to challenge you to do a Fear Dump and share one of your new power statements here.

Begin Anyhow: Living with Discomfort

Begin Anyhow: Learning to Live with Discomfort

Begin Anyhow: Learning to Live with Discomfort

Art credit: Lisa Congdon

Lately I’ve been having a lot of new ideas. Ideas for my business, ideas for redoing our backyard, ideas for new knitting projects, the list goes on. I’m great at ideas!  New ideas are fun and creative and give me a ton energy.

Something inevitably creeps up between the idea stage and the action stage: discomfort.

At its best, this gnawing feeling of discomfort can be mildly annoying, persisting in the background of daily life. It’s something you can choose to ignore, to push away.

Discomfort will also show itself in the form of self-doubt, fear, uncertainty.  Every decision is difficult. You start to feel unfocused, scattered, and overwhelmed.

At its worst, this discomfort can become terrifying and paralyzing. It will jump onto your back and cripple you with its weight.  It stops you from moving forward in your daily tasks with any ease.  Your mind is anxious, wrestling with the excitement of your idea and the uncertainty that wants to crush it.

I have felt this way before every major thing I’ve created or changed in my life. 

Two years ago I had the first inkling of wanting to start a podcast for creatives. I held the idea close to my heart for months, too afraid too even tell anyone about it.

Starting a podcast was an idea that I couldn’t shake; I thought about it all the time! The creative spark had been ignited, and I was having constantly having new thoughts and ideas for the podcast.  Looking back, I know that was my intuition trying to get my attention, to counteract the self-doubt that was starting to creep in.

You see, I was SO afraid of putting myself out there in a new way.  Discomfort would follow me around and assert its presence at inconvenient moments, reminding me of my insecurities.  The thought of sharing my ideas and opinions over live audio was scary!  I didn’t know where to begin or what steps to take.  I worried no one would listen.

These fears and uncertainties followed me for months until it just started to feel silly.  Eventually I knew that the discomfort of not knowing how it would go or what I would do wasn’t so bad compared to the idea of not trying at all.

I needed to feel the discomfort and begin anyway.

I took action and sought out supportive mentors, found tutorials for starting a podcast, and reached out to my first set of guests. Suddenly it didn’t feel so scary anymore!

Every uncertain step I took in the direction of my dream to start a podcast added momentum, and eventually I was running forward, too inspired to look back at what I was so afraid of!

I recently put out the Season 2 finale episode of my podcast, featuring an interview with artist Lisa Congdon. Getting to speak with such interesting and inspiring creatives has been such a joy; I can’t believe I almost let discomfort hold me back!

Don’t let fear or uncertainty stop you. Let it motivate you.

It’s good to pay attention to that feeling of uncertainty and fear. But it is in this moment that you have some thinking to do.  You can let it stop you, or you can feel it, work with it and let it propel you.

Somewhere along the way, this discomfort is something that I have learned to live with.  I started asking myself if the discomfort would be something I could live with if I never took the risk. I use discomfort as a tool to tap into my intuition, to ask myself: is the risk I am about to take worth it?  Would I regret not going for it?


Is there a time you pushed through discomfort to discover something great?  The more you do this, the easier it becomes. Share your wins below so we can celebrate with you!

Creativity, Self-Care & The Mama Advantage

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I recently had the honor of joining my business coach Megan Flatt and fellow Mama CEO and writer Parrish Wilson on a new podcast: The Mama Advantage.  Megan’s premise for the podcast is that as women, mothers, and entrepreneurs, we bring added value to all of our roles. She’s exploring this idea alongside some very rich topics. I can’t wait to see what’s next!

Listen in to Episode 2 to hear each of our stories of rising up and starting our own businesses while also having young kids. Parrish and I share what creativity and self-care mean to us, and we even share our own Mama Advantages.  I dive into my views on the role of creativity and the value of self care in my life; and I enjoyed hearing the other women’s views as well.

I’d love for you to give it a listen and let me know what you think!

Click here to listen to the podcast. 

On Wanting to be a Writer

On Wanting to Be a Writer

I always wanted to be a writer.

As a child I filled notebooks and stacks of printer paper with my writing and drawings. When our family got its first word processor, I was in heaven.  I could write to my heart’s content, without cramping my hand. Plus, once I printed it out and put it in a report cover with a hand-drawn illustration, it looked like a REAL book!

Writing came to me in a way that seemed fluid and natural.  All through school, I sailed through essays, devoured books, and set my sights on being an English major in college. I wanted to be a capital W writer.

And even though I enjoyed writing and words and language, I never really felt like one of the “smart kids”.  I wasn’t in National Honor Society or getting straight A’s. Sure, I took a couple of AP classes, but I never really felt like I belonged.

When I got to college, I was determined to find my people and belong to something meaningful.  I started out as an English major.  My advisor was a Real Author and capitol W writer and intimidated the hell out of me.  He had a serious disposition and kind eyes;  I always anticipated and feared what would come out of his mouth in equal measure.

The other kids in my literature and writing classes were often the serious types who got all the literary and historical references that seemed to go right over my head. I quickly grew insecure about everything I didn’t know and doubted myself at every turn. I thought everything that came out of me was worthless and not worthy of sharing with the groups.

I changed my major and tried to forget that I wanted to be a Writer.

About 10 years later I started a blog and started enjoying writing again.  It was something simple and low-pressure. I would write about my knitting and other creative pursuits to share with other crafters. It was a safe space of my own making, and I didn’t put a lot of pressure on myself. At that time, it didn’t feel like there was a lot of judgement back then, even if your pictures were kind of crappy (mine totally were).

But over time, I started to really enjoy the process of writing, and that yearning to do it more seriously crept back into my consiousness.

So here I am nearly 20 years later, still longing to be a writer, still questioning whether I have something worthwhile to share.

It’s something I think about nearly every day.  Writing writing writing writing. Clearly something is pushing its way out of me, I just need to give it the time to come out.

What you focus on expands. You make time for what is important to you.

Writing is always on my list of unfulfilled dreams, a thing I often say I wish I did more of. And yet, when I have space to write in my day, I often fill it with other things.  Which leaves me with a continued sense of yearning.

Back in the fall I wrote about spending 15 minutes a day on something.  I typically choose to spend my 15 minutes reading or writing. After beginning this practice, I quickly noticed that after just a few days, my mind felt brighter and more eager, new ideas flowing in with ease.  I had tons of ideas for new blog posts, and even a little nugget for a book. Scary and thrilling!

It felt so good. And yet…

Sometimes I still procrastinate writing or getting really vulnerable and honest by doing other things that feel more productive.  I think I fill the space I could spend writing because I am afraid.  The more I avoid getting real on the page, the more this sense of yearning grows. And along with that yearning, a mounting sense of self-doubt.

If I want to write so much, why don’t I just do it?  Is it that I am afraid I don’t have anything to say?  Or is it the opposite: that I’m afraid I DO have something to say?


Knowing that we’re not alone in our insecurities and overwhelm can make such a difference in mindset.  What do you yearn to do?  Have you taken small steps to get closer to that goal?  I’d love to hear from you!